Behavioral Health in the Nursing Home: Building a Web One Thread at a Time

AnnKolanowskiFlyer_Opt2On Wednesday, April 29, IOA Visiting Scholar, Ann Marie Kolanowski, PhD, RN, FGSA, FAAN, professor, Penn State School of Nursing, discussed her team’s research on improving behavioral health and testing non-pharmacological interventions in nursing homes.

Dr. Kolanowski explained that her work has helped to establish significant evidence for non-pharmacological approaches as the first line of treatment for behavioral issues in the elderly, especially since antipsychotic drugs have been linked to adverse effects and even increased mortality. Dr. Kolanowski’s approach relies heavily on understanding the patients interests and abilities and tailoring your approach accordingly. Intervention strategies included group and individual activities that met the needs of each specific patient. Based on this approach, Dr. Kolanowski found that the majority of patients experienced significant improvements in mood and behavior.

Dr. Kolanowski and her team have also developed the NursingHome Toolkit, an online resource with the goal of assisting nursing home staff in the implementation of these non-pharmacological strategies for the behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. To view the Toolkit, visit: http://www.nursinghometoolkit.com

View the full lecture here.

Advertisements

Aging with Financial Security: Addressing the Challenges of Cognitive Aging and Impairment

Sylvan M. Cohen Annual Retreat 2015
On Tuesday, May 5, 2015, the Institute on Aging hosted their Sylvan M. Cohen Annual Retreat. The event, which took place from 11:30am-5:00pm in the Smilow Center for Translational Research at the University of Pennsylvania, consisted of lunch, lectures, a reception and a poster session.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Lectures
This year, the IOA welcomed several outside speakers, ranging from financial experts to medical professionals. Their presentations discussed a variety of topics on adult protective services, financial security, and financial exploitation and abuse in the aging community. For the full list of speakers and their presentations, download the event’s agenda here.

Reception and Poster Session
Immediately following the lectures, guests were welcomed back into the Smilow Center lobby for the event’s reception and poster session. The poster session, a popular feature of the retreat, invites University of Pennsylvania affiliates and colleagues from around the Philadelphia area to present their aging-related research, educational activities and services and compete for a “best poster” prize. First and second prize winners were chosen based on the following categories: Basic Science, Clinical Research, and Education and Community.

Basic Science – 1st Place:
St172udying Alpha-synuclein Misfolding through Forster Resonance Energy
Presented by
: John Ferrie
Authors: John Ferrie, Conor Haney, Rebecca Wissner, and E. James Petersson

 

 

Basic Science – 2nd Place:
173Prepubertal Adversity can Produce Resistance to Cognitive Decline and Associated White Matter Changes
Presented by
: Kathleen E. Morrison
Authors: Kathleen E. Morrison, Sneha Marasimhan, Tracy L. Bale

 

 

Clinical Research – 1st Place:
174Neuropsychological Functioning in the Acute and Remitted States of Late-life Depression
Presented by: Aaron M. Koenig
Authors: Aaron M. Koenig, Isaac J. DeLozier, Michelle D. Zmuda, Megan M. Marron, Amy E. Begley, Stewart J. Anderson, Charles F. Reynolds, Steven E. Arnold, James T. Becker, Meryl A. Butters

Clinical Research – 2nd Place:
175Evaluation of a Telephone Dementia Care Management Program for Caregivers of Community Dwelling Older Adults
Presented by
: Amy Benson
Authors: Shahrzad Mavandadi, Amy Benson, Kristen Foust, Suzanne DiFilippo, Joel Streim, David Oslin, Tom Snedden

 

Education & Community – 1st Place
176Silver Dollars: How a Senior Center is Helping Older Adults Avert Housing and Financial Crises
Presented by:
Megan C. McCoy, MSS, MLSP
Authors: Megan C. McCoy, MSS, MLSP

 

 

Education & Community – 2nd Place
177Age-friendly Banking: Policy, Products, and Services for Financial Capability
Presented by
: Karen Kali
Authors: Sehar N. Siddiqi, Robert O. Zdenek, Ed J. Gorman III

 

In light of the recent IOM report on cognitive aging, this year’s retreat was especially popular, bringing in nearly 160 attendees and receiving media coverage from the Philadelphia Inquirer and WHYY.

Check out some footage from the event and hear from IOA Director, John Q. Trojanowski, MD, PhD, as well as retreat attendees and poster presenters, including Clinical Research 2nd Prize winner, Amy Benson:

The 2015 Sylvan M. Cohen Annual Retreat was co-sponsored by the Penn ADCC Outreach, Recruitment, and Education Core, Penn Healthy Brain Research Network, Penn Neurodegenerative Disease Ethics and Policy Program, and the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy.

To view the full lectures from this event, click here.
To view more photos from the event, click here.
To view Dr. Jason Karlawish’s video interview on the recent IOM report on cognitive aging, click here.

Occupational Attainment in Frontotemporal Degeneration

According to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, doctors, lawyers and other “high level” professionals may have an advantage if diagnosed with Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD).

Lauren Massimo, PhD, CRNP, a post-doctoral fellow at Penn’s FTD Center, and her fellow researchers working on this study believe that these individuals with higher level occupations typically build stronger “cognitive reserve,” aiding in the defense of this neurodegenerative disease which effects behavior, personality, and in some cases, language.

Read more in the full Penn Medicine News Release.

To learn more about the Penn FTD Center, visit: http://ftd.med.upenn.edu

A Virtual Tour of the Penn Udall Center for Parkinson’s Research

The goals of the Morris K. Udall Parkinson’s Disease Research Center of Excellence, which was launched at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in 2007, are to shed light on the mechanisms of disease progression and alpha-synuclein transmission through collaborations between basic and translational research.

Throughout this virtual tour, you will visit the various researchers and clinicians who have dedicated their lives to fulfilling these goals. As you will see, their mission is to conduct multidisciplinary clinical, translational, and basic research that improves the understanding of and develops better treatments for patients with Parkinson’s disease. These ideas are the driving force behind each of the Cores and Projects listed below that will be highlighted in this tour:

Udall Cores:
Core A: Administrative Core
Core B: Clinical Core
Core D: Neuropathology, Biomarker, and Genetics Core
Core C: Biostatistics, Bioinformatics, and Data Management Core

Udall Projects:
Project I: A Multimodal Biomarker Approach to Evaluating and Predicting Cognitive Decline in Lewy Body Diseases
Project II: Mechanisms of PD Executive Dysfunction in Language
Project III: Mechanisms of Transmission of Pathological Alpha-synuclein in Neurons
Project IV: Immunotherapy Targeting PD Transmission in Animal Models

For more information on the Udall Center on Parkinson’s Research, visit: http://www.med.upenn.edu/udall