Can postponing ill-health via comprehensive damage repair extend human lifespan indefinitely?

On Tuesday, December 6, 2016, the Institute on Aging (IOA) welcomed Aubrey de Grey, PhD, Chief Science Officer at the SENS Research Foundation, for a Visiting Scholars Series lecture on “Rejuvenation biotechnology: Postponing ill-health via comprehensive damage repair.”

The SENS Research Foundation is a public charity doing biomedical research with a focus on developing new medicines that may be more effective than current methods in postponing the ill health of old age.

“I do think that the general concept of eliminating damage that the body does to itself is something in which the sky is the limit,” said Dr. de Grey.

He compared this idea to the example of restoring vintage cars. He explained that since we are able to keep cars going essentially forever just by periodic and comprehensive preventative maintenance, we should be able to do the same thing for the human body, ultimately maintaining people in “truly youthful health indefinitely.”

While he does recognize that the human body is much more complex, Dr. de Grey believes that “the further we get in the process of developing methods for eliminating the various types of damage that the body does to itself, the more slowly we will accumulate damage because we will only be left with the residual damage that we haven’t yet worked out how to fix.”

Watch Dr. de Grey’s full lecture here!

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New “Human-like” Animal Model Better Mirrors Tangles in Alzheimer’s Disease Brains

virginialee-inlabResearchers at the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research (CNDR) have developed a new mouse model to better replicate the neurofibrillary tangles that form in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

In the video below, Virginia M.-Y. Lee, PhD, MBA, Director of CNDR and senior author of the study, explains that until now, researchers have been using synthetic tau tangles made in the lab — engineering mice to overexpress the tau proteins in order for the tangles to form. The new study instead uses authentic tangles taken from Alzheimer’s brains and injected into normal mice to provide a more accurate model not only of the properties in AD brains, but also how the disease spreads over time.

These findings are especially important in terms of moving forward with developing potential treatments for Alzheimer’s disease. “It is essential for us to have animal models so we can use them to test the efficacy of potential treatments before they go into humans,” said Dr. Lee.

This study was published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine and featured by ALN.

Penn Medicine News Release.

The Longevity Dividend

On Tuesday, November 29, 2016, the Institute on Aging hosted its annual Vincent J. Cristofalo Lectureship and reception featuring this year’s keynote speaker, S. Jay Olshansky, PhD, professor of public health at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Dr. Olshansky’s research focuses primarily on human longevity, exploring the health and public policy implications associated with individual and population aging, global implications of the re-emergence of infectious and parasitic diseases, and most recently, the topic of his Cristofalo Lecture; the pursuit of the scientific means to slow aging in people, or as he calls it “The Longevity Dividend.”

“The Longevity Dividend,” a term borrowed from the era of the “peace dividend,” is basically the idea that if we can find a way to slow the basic biological aging process, both society and individuals will reap huge economic and health benefits.

Over the years, human life expectancy has become longer but the success of extended lifespans come with a price. With the ridding of many infectious diseases came the rise of other conditions such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease; three different diseases with one thing in common—the process of aging being their most powerful risk factor.

“The rise of these diseases are nota consequence of failure… they are a consequence of success. You’ve lived long enough to experience them. But, the consequences of success might be very dangerous.” – S. Jay Olshansky, PhD

Dr. Olshanksy shared more on the “longevity dividend” during our video interview here:

In addition to his current research on “The Longevity Dividend,” Dr. Olshansky and his colleagues have also conducted research on “facial analytics” combined with biodemography. The study of facial analytics uses components of the face to measure disease risk, longevity risk, and survival prospects. Through this research, Dr. Olshansky and his team are trying to find new ways of allowing organizations and industries to use what we know about ourselves to improve the ways that they do assessments of health and survival.

Recently, Dr. Olshansky and his colleagues published an article in Computer that lays out the framework for building a “health data economy.”

“I think a new form of “currency” will be developed and this “currency” will be your own health data,” explained Dr. Olshansky. The idea is to take data from Fit Bits and other wearable monitoring devices monetize this information, for instance, selling your recorded health data to companies and organizations in exchange for things like money, lower premiums on health insurance policies, coupons, and more. He believes that this resource could be the new form of collecting health data and could inspire a whole new generation of citizen scientists.

To watch Dr. Olshansky’s full lecture on “The Longevity Dividend,” click here.

To learn more about the Vincent J. Cristofalo lectureship, click here.