“Modeling Neurodegenerative Diseases,” CNDR’s 2017 Marian S. Ware Research Retreat

Screen Shot 2017-11-09 at 1.27.43 PMOn Thursday, October 19, 2017, Penn’s Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research (CNDR) hosted its annual Marian S. Ware Research Retreat. This year’s topic was “Modeling Neurodegenerative Diseases” and featured a variety of expert speakers within the field.

“As is the tradition with CNDR retreats, every year we focus on a different aspect of neurodegenerative disease. This year, our theme was how to model the complexity of these conditions, for example at the molecular, cellular, and systems levels. The internal and external speakers provided a rich sampling of cutting-edge work being done on each of these areas,” said Kelvin Luk, PhD, Research Assistant Professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and organizer of this year’s CNDR Retreat.

“Among the highlights were the trainee presentations, while we were treated to some spectacular methods for visualizing intact tissues and modeling how disease might be spreading across the central nervous system. Our keynote speaker also finished off by giving a glimpse of the disease process as it advances in living AD patients.

Overall, I think/hope it was enjoyed by all that were present. The feedback was very positive and we were able to bring together many members of the local (Penn and extramural) community from very diverse backgrounds.” – Kelvin Luk, PhD

In addition to the lectures, the day-long event also includes an annual poster session where scientists in all stages of their career, from Penn and beyond, can present their current and recent neurodegenerative-disease related research. The top three posters are selected by experienced judges and are awarded prizes. See this year’s poster winners below!

2017 Marian S. Ware Research Retreat Poster Winners

1st Prize:

Poster Title: “Genome-wide Co-translational Decay of Canonical mRNAs”
Authors: Fadia Ibrahim, Manolis Maragkakis, Panagiotis Alexiou, and Zissimos Mourelatos
Affiliation: University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Division of Neuropathology

2nd Prize:

Poster Title: “Amnestic and Non-Amnestic Phenotypes of Alzheimer’s Disease: An MRI-Based Phasing Analysis”
Authors: Fulvio Da Re1,2,3, Jeffery S Phillips1,4, Laynie Dratch1, Carlo Ferrarese3, David J. Irwin1,4, Corey T. McMillan1,4, Eddie Lee5, Leslie M Shaw5, John Q Trojanowski5, David A Wolk4,6, and Murray Grossman1,4
Affiliation: 1) Penn FTD Center, University of Pennsylvania, 2) PhD Program in Neuroscience, University of MilanoBicocca, Milan, Italy, 3) School of Medicine and Surgery, Milan Center for Neuroscience (NeuroMI), University of MilanoBicocca, Milan, Italy, 4) Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 5) Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research, University of Pennsylvania, 6) Penn Memory Center, University of Pennsylvania

3rd Prize:

Poster Title: “Tau and Synuclein: a Tojan horse in the making?”
Authors: Hannah J. Brown, Fares Bassil, Shankar Pattabhiraman, Bin Zhang, Dawn Riddle, John Q. Trojanowski, Virginia M.-Y. Lee
Affiliations: Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Institute on Aging and Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine

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Full list of 2017 CNDR Retreat Speakers:Screen Shot 2017-11-09 at 1.26.02 PM.

Learn more about CNDR here.

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Genetics of Aging-Related Neurodegeneration: The Sylvan M. Cohen Annual Retreat & Poster Session 2017

077On Tuesday, May 23, 2017, the Institute on Aging (IOA) hosted their annual Sylvan M. Cohen Retreat and Poster Session in collaboration with co-sponsors, the Penn Neurodegeneration Genomics Center (PNGC).

The 2017 retreat focused on the ‘Genetics of Aging-related Neurodegeneration’ and for the second year in a row, it began with opening remarks from the Dean of the Perelman School of Medicine, J. Larry Jameson, MD, PhD. “I’m mainly here to thank you for your scientific collaboration,” said Dean Jameson. He used this time to express the importance and impact of these contributions in the field of genetics and aging, especially in trying to solve the puzzle of very complex conditions such as neurodegeneration.

Lectures were presented by Penn’s Gerard (Jerry) D. Schellenberg, PhD, Director of the PNGC, Adam Naj, PhD, Assistant professor of Epidemiology in Biostatistics and Epidemiology, and Nancy Zhang, PhD, Assistant professor of Statistics, as well as this year’s keynote speaker, Philip De Jager, MD, PhD, Associate Neurologist at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Associate Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School.

Lectures:

  • “Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics; Progress in Gene Therapy” – Jerry Schellenberg, PhD
  • “Genetic Risk Factors Associated with Coincident Alzheimer’s and Parkinson Disease in Neuropathologically Confirmed Cases” – Adam Naj, PhD
  • “Structural Variant Profiling in Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics” – Nancy Zhang, PhD
  • “The molecular network map of the aging cortex: v1.0: an integrative approach targets the epigenomic and inflammatory components of Tau pathology” – Philip De Jager, MD, PhD

As usual, the event concluded with the annual poster session on aging. Prizes were awarded to the top posters in each of the following categories: Basic Science and Clinical Research/Education & Community.

Poster Winners:

BASIC SCIENCE:

1st Place:

172Title: “Integrative analysis identifies immune-related enhancers and IncRNAs perturbed by genetic variants associated with Alzheimer’s disease”
Presenter: Alexandre Amlie-Wolf
Authors: Alexandre Amlie-Wolf, Mitchell Tang, Jessica King, Beth Dombroski, Elizabeth Mlynarski,Yi-Fan Chou, Gerard D. Schellenberg, Li-San Wang
Affiliation(s): University of Pennsylvania, Genomics and Computational Biology Graduate Group

2nd Place:

173Title: “Differential Vulnerability to a-synuclein Pathology Among Neuronal Subpopulations”
Presenter: Luna Esteban
Authors: Luna Esteban, Dawn M. Riddle, Virginia M.Y. Lee, Kelvin C. Luk
Affiliation(s): Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research

 


Clinical Research/Education & Community

1st Place:

175Title: “Correlates of Sleep Indices Among Community Dwelling Older Adults Enrolled in a Collaborative Care Management Program”
Presenter: Ashik Ansar
Authors: Ashik Ansar, MD, PhD, Shahrzad Mavandadi, PhD, Kristin Foust, Suzanne DiFilippo, RN, Joel E.. Streim, MD, David W. Oslin, MD
Affiliation(s): Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania

2nd Place:

176Title: “The Impact of Cognitive Reserve and Brain Atrophy on Survival in Neurodegenerative Diseases”
Presenter: Carrie Caswell
Authors: Carrie Caswell, MS (1), Sharon X. Xie, PhD (1), Murray Grossman, MD, EdD (1), Corey T. McMillan, PhD (1), Lauren M. Massimo, PhD, CRNP (1,2)
Affiliation(s): (1) University of Pennsylvania, (2) Penn State University

To view the full lectures from the 2017 Sylvan M. Cohen Annual Retreat, click here.

To view more photos from the 2017 Sylvan M. Cohen Annual Retreat, click here.

 

“Through the Eyes of the Caregiver: Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) and the Penn FTD Center” premieres at the Penn FTD Center Caregiver Conference 2017

On Friday, May 12, 2017, the Penn Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) Center hosted its 9th annual Penn FTD Caregivers Conference at the University of Pennsylvania. The day-long conference held at the Smilow Center for Translational Research welcomed 150 attendees and consisted of a series of lectures that covered information around the latest scientific advances in research on FTD and its related disorders, such as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease and Corticobasal degeneration (CBD), as well as practical caregiving issues such as strategies for symptom management, understanding the genetics of FTD and genetic testing options, respite and supportive resources for caregivers, and legal and long-term care planning.

One of the highlights of this year’s conference was the premiere of “Through the Eyes of the Caregiver: Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) and the Penn FTD Center,” a short film sharing the stories of three caregivers whose loved ones are patients at the Penn FTD Center.

“The brunt of this disease falls solely on those closest to the individual with the disease unfortunately and it is very difficult to navigate the healthcare system and obtain the types of resources that give structure to a patient’s day-to-day life and to help a caregiver keep a patient safe and cognitively stimulated,” said David Irwin, MD, assistant professor and Cognitive Neurologist in the Penn FTD Center. The goal of this video is to show caregivers and family members of those with FTD that they are not alone in this life-altering process and that there are many support groups and community and medical resources available to them – including many at the Penn FTD Center – to help them every step of the way.

Watch “Through the Eyes of the Caregiver: Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) and the Penn FTD Center”*:

Two Penn FTD Caregivers Conference sponsors, the Alzheimer’s Association Delaware Valley Chapter and the Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD), were also in attendance to answer questions and present information on the many advocacy and community resources that they offer for patients with FTD or related disorders and their families and caregivers.

Learn more about the Penn FTD Center at: https://ftd.med.upenn.edu

* Learn more about each individual caregiver by watching their full story! Click the “i” icon bubble in the top right hand corner of the video for a drop down menu with links to each caregivers story! If you are watching on a mobile phone, click the title of the video which will open a drop down menu containing the links to each caregiver’s story as well as a link to the Virtual Tour of Penn’s FTD PPG and Penn FTD Center to learn more about the FTD research and care taking place at Penn.

CNDR Celebrates 25 Years of Groundbreaking Research

This year, Penn’s Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research (CNDR) is celebrating 25 years of groundbreaking research.

Celebrating 25 Years

In honor of this milestone, Penn Medicine organized an intimate anniversary event generously hosted by longtime supporters and friends of CNDR, Bob Lane, who is also an Institute on Aging External Advisory Board (IOA EAB) member, and his wife, Randi Zemsky, at their home in the Rittenhouse Square section of Philadelphia.

The event celebrated the work of CNDR over the past 25 years and highlighted research breakthroughs still on the horizon. It was also an opportunity to bring together and thank many of the Center’s supporters. The event was attended by David B. Roth, MD, PhD, Chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, CNDR researchers, IOA EAB members, supporters of the Center and close friends of the hosts.

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The History

— from “A Conversation with Drs. Lee and Trojanowski,” an article by Lisa Bain featured in the CNDR 25th Anniversary special edition newsletter (page 3) — 

Some twenty-five years ago when John Q. Trojanowski, MD, PhD, first envisioned a Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research (CNDR), Virginia M.-Y. Lee, PhD, MBA, saw only the additional paperwork that would be required. Since they were both already well established in the field, she thought, “what do we need a center for?” But he convinced her that branding and identifying CNDR as a common locus for studies of Alzheimer’s (AD) and Parkinson’s (PD) disease as well as Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig’s disease was very important to pursue; and they both knew that the mission — to find cures for these neurodegenerative diseases — was not something that they alone could solve.

They would need a team, infrastructure, an environment that would be welcoming to a multidisciplinary group of collaborators (see Figure 1) and of course, funding. “And that is the dream for CNDR that has come true,” said Trojanowski.

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Get the full story of CNDR’s history, mission, research, and programs in the 25th Anniversary special edition newsletter here:

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CNDR’s Annual Marian S. Ware Research Retreat Through the Years

Each year, CNDR hosts its annual Marian S. Ware Research Retreat to highlight any current or groundbreaking discoveries at CNDR and in the field of neurodegenerative disease research at large. Since the first event in 2000, CNDR has covered a variety of themes from genetics to training the next generation of scientists. Stay tuned for information on CNDR’s 2017 Research Retreat, but for now, take a look back at some of the topics covered in the past:

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You can also view an interactive timeline, including lists of past Retreat speakers, here!
(view in 3D mode for best experience)

Learn more about CNDR at: www.med.upenn.edu/cndr

 

 

CNDR Researcher receives second place prize for poster on Alpha-Synuclein at 2016 Udall Center Directors Meeting

Last month, Chao Peng, a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research, won a second place poster prize at the 2016 Udall Center Directors Annual Meeting.

Title: “Distinct Pathological a-Synuclein Strains in Glial Cytoplasmic Inclusions and Lewy Bodies”
Presenter: Chao Peng
Authors: Chao X. Peng, Ronald Gathagan, Dustin J. Covell, Anna Stieber, Coraima Medellin, John L. Robinson, Bin Zhang, Kelvin C. Luk, John Q. Trojanowski, Virginia M.-Y. Lee

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Chao Peng (second from the right) with Walter Koroshetz, MD, Director of NINDS (far left), and his fellow poster winners at the Udall Center Directors Meeting.

Peng’s poster was on the properties of the misfolded alpha-synuclein protein in different neurodegenerative diseases.

Alpha-synuclein is known for playing a key role in the development of Parkinson’s disease (PD), however, this protein is not unique to PD. Alpha-synuclein is also present in the brains of patients with Lewy body dementia (LBD) and Multiple system atrophy (MSA).

During a video interview with the Institute on Aging (see below), Chao Peng explains that alpha-synuclein accumulation is also present in almost 50% of Alzheimer’s disease cases.

While these diseases all show signs of this same misfolded protein, they actually exhibit very different pathological and clinical behaviors than one would experience with Parkinson’s disease—but how?

Chao Peng and his colleagues at CNDR are using multiple different cell and animal models to better understand not only how this occurs and why the same misfolded protein can cause one disease in one patient but something different in others, but what this could mean for potential treatments. Learn more here:

Penn’s CNDR celebrates 25 years of groundbreaking research with the supporters and friends who make it all possible

screen-shot-2016-11-08-at-3-01-13-pmThis year, the Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research is celebrating its 25th anniversary in a big way. Penn Medicine organized an intimate anniversary event generously hosted by longtime supporters and friends of CNDR, Bob Lane, an Institute on Aging External Advisory Board (IOA EAB) member, and his wife Randi Zemsky, at their home in the Rittenhouse Square section of Philadelphia. 

 

The event celebrated the groundbreaking work of CNDR over the past 25 years and highlighted research breakthroughs still on the horizon. It was also an opportunity to bring together and thank many of the center’s supporters. The event was attended by David B. Roth, MD, PhD, Chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, CNDR researchers, IOA EAB members, supporters of the Center and close friends of the hosts.

Stay tuned for our special edition CNDR 25th Anniversary Newsletter coming early next year.

CNDR’s 2016 Marian S. Ware Research Retreat: “Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease Drug Discovery”

On Tuesday, October 11, 2016, Penn’s Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research (CNDR) hosted its annual Marian S. Ware Research Retreat. This year, the theme of the event was “Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease Drug Discovery” and was organized by Kurt Brunden, PhD, Director of Drug Discovery and Research Professor at CNDR.

Presenters included David M. Holtzman, MD of Washington University School of Medicine and Laura Volpicelli-Daley, PhD of University of Alabama, Birmingham, as well as industry representatives, Richard Ransohoff, MD of Biogen, Inc., and Mark Forman, MD, PhD of Merck & Co., Inc., in addition to several postdoctoral researchers from Penn.

Throughout the day, guests were invited to browse the nearly 50 neurodegenerative disease research related posters on display for the annual poster session. The event concluded with awards given to the top three posters of the day.

First Place

Title: “alpha-Tubulin Tyrosination and CLIP- 170 Phosphorylation Regulate the Initiation of Dynein-Driven Transport in Neurons
Presenter: Jeffrey Nirschl
Authors: Jeffrey J. Nirschl, Maria M. Magiera, Jacob E. Lazarus, Carsten Janke, Erika L. F. Holzbaur

Second Place:
Title: “Monitoring Conformational Changes in alpha-Synuclein During Aggregation and Small Molecule Treatment”
Presenter: Conor Haney
Authors: Conor M. Haney, John J. Ferrie, Tiberiu Mihaila, Marcello Chang, Jimin Yoon, E. James Petersson

Third Place:
Title: “Distinct Pathological a-Synuclein Strains in Glial Cytoplasmic Inclusions and Lewy Bodies”
Presenter: Chao Peng
Authors: Chao X. Peng, Ronald Gathagan, Dustin J. Covell, Anna Stieber, Coraima Medellin, John L. Robinson, Bin Zhang, Kelvin C. Luk, John Q. Trojanowski, Virginia M.-Y. Lee

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Presentations* (click to download):

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*Please note: Not all presentations can be shared online due to unpublished data.