World Elder Abuse Awareness Day 2017

weaad_rgb_small-1-300x300.jpgToday, June 15, 2017 is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day (WEAAD). Created in 2006 by the International Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and the World Health Organization at the United Nations, WEAAD strives to raise awareness of the cultural, social, economic and demographic issues of elder abuse and neglect. Elder abuse can present in several different forms such as physical or psychological abuse, neglect, or exploitation, and is an important public health and human rights issue that should be recognized as such.

“Every year an estimated 5 million, or 1 in 10, older Americans are victims of elder abuse, neglect, or exploitation. And experts believe that for every reported case of elder abuse or neglect, as many as 23.5 cases go unreported.” – USC Center on Elder Mistreatment

For a variety of educational tools & tips on how to identify, address, and prevent these issues, visit the University of Southern California (USC) Center on Elder Mistreatment’s WEAAD website. Information includes:

Show your support for World Elder Abuse Awareness Day by finishing the sentence below, downloading the image, and sharing your answer on social media! Don’t forget to use the hashtag #WEAAD!

Screen Shot 2017-06-14 at 2.19.45 PM

Download image here.

For more information on World Elder Abuse Awareness Day, click here.

World Elder Abuse Awareness Day 2016

WORLD ELDER ABUSE AWARENESS DAY (WEAAD)

WEADD-Logo-RGBToday, June 15, 2016, organizations around the world are joining in the mutual effort to promote a better understanding of elder abuse and neglect of seniors “by raising awareness of the cultural, social, economic and demographic processes affecting elder abuse and neglect,” according to the National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA).

Every year an estimated 5 million older Americans are victims of elder abuse, neglect, or exploitation and experts believe that for every case reported, as many as 23 cases go unreported, explains NCEA.

By spreading awareness and increasing knowledge on elder abuse, you can help stop this vicious cycle. NCEA created a variety of guides, outreach tools, and fact sheets to share, including:

SUPPORT FOR SENIORS IN PHILADELPHIA

Locally, organizations in and around the Philadelphia area are doing their part to support the wellbeing of our aging community.

Philadelphia Corporation for Aging (PCA) Older Adult Protective Services

“In Philadelphia, all forms of elder abuse can be reported to PCA’s Older Adult Protective Services 24/7 by calling the PCA Helpline at 215-765-9040. In fiscal year 2015 (July 1, 2014 – June 30, 2015), PCA’s Older Adult Protective Services received 3,262 reports of suspected abuse, neglect and financial exploitation of older adults.”

Learn more at PCAcares.org

CARIE: Center for Advocacy for the Rights & Interests of the Elderly

CARIE’s mission is to “improve the well being, rights, and autonomy of older persons through advocacy, education, and action.” They offer a variety of resources including the “CARIE LINE” and “CARIE OnLINE” telephone and online consultation service, victim’s advocacy programs, transportation problems resolution, and help for people in nursing homes and personal care homes, to name a few.

Learn more at: www.carie.org

The Ralston Center’s Age Friendly West Philadelphia Initiative

“Ralston’s Age-Friendly West Philadelphia Initiative is a collaborative partnership of local and citywide stakeholders, convened and facilitated by Ralston Center, to create age-friendly changes in West Philadelphia.  The initiative is committed to making the physical and social environments in West Philadelphia more conducive to older adults’ health, well-being and ability to age in place.”

Learn more at: http://ralstoncenter.org/

Safe Travels: Considerations for Senior Vacationers

Prior to Travel:

  • Screen Shot 2015-07-06 at 1.53.47 PMMake sure you are up-to-date on all of your necessary vaccinations, especially when traveling overseas.
    Some destinations may require certain vaccinations before departing, in some cases – up to six weeks before you leave.
  • Inform your healthcare provider of your plans and excursions and discuss any specific travel precautions you should take.
  • If you are on daily medications, ask your healthcare provider about whether you should switch to the local time zone or stick to your usual home time zone, as well as if there are any cultural foods that may interact with your medications.
  • If you or someone you are traveling with is physically disabled, be sure to arrange the necessary accommodations prior to departure. Airports offer wheelchairs and other wheeled devices to assist in your travels, but it is best to plan ahead and know exactly how to be granted these special requests to avoid any confusion or delays. It is also good to speak directly with someone from your hotel to address your needs and make sure all of your reservations offer handicap accessible features.

While Traveling:

  • Keep a written list of all medications, dosages, and medication times from your healthcare provider or pharmacist. This will help with any issues passing through customs or if you lose your medications and need to get replacements. Make two copies; carry one with you and keep one in your suitcase.
  • To protect yourself from deep-vein thrombosis, or blood clots, try to avoid sitting or long periods of time as much as possible. Some research finds wearing special “compression stockings” can help prevent this damage, but consult with your healthcare provider if you are scheduled for a long flight, train or car ride.
  • Stay hydrated. Older adults are particularly prone to dehydration. If you are flying, the air inside of planes can be very dry. Bring a large bottle of water or ask for some every time a flight attendant offers a drink. Once you arrive at your destination, it is important to make a conscious effort to drink plenty of water on a regular basis. It is easy  to fall short when you are out of your home routine, but this will keep you feeling hydrated and energized and minimize your chances of falling ill while traveling.
  • Protect yourself from the sun. Older adults are more susceptible to sunburn, so try to stay in the shade as much as possible during peak hours and wear a broad-spectrum sunscreen at all times. It is also important to check all of your medications for sun-related warnings, as some may further increase sensitivity to UVA and UVB rays.
Tips courtesy of healthinaging.org and nyp.org.
Photo courtesy of traveltips.usa.com.