New “Human-like” Animal Model Better Mirrors Tangles in Alzheimer’s Disease Brains

virginialee-inlabResearchers at the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research (CNDR) have developed a new mouse model to better replicate the neurofibrillary tangles that form in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

In the video below, Virginia M.-Y. Lee, PhD, MBA, Director of CNDR and senior author of the study, explains that until now, researchers have been using synthetic tau tangles made in the lab — engineering mice to overexpress the tau proteins in order for the tangles to form. The new study instead uses authentic tangles taken from Alzheimer’s brains and injected into normal mice to provide a more accurate model not only of the properties in AD brains, but also how the disease spreads over time.

These findings are especially important in terms of moving forward with developing potential treatments for Alzheimer’s disease. “It is essential for us to have animal models so we can use them to test the efficacy of potential treatments before they go into humans,” said Dr. Lee.

This study was published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine and featured by ALN.

Penn Medicine News Release.

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