Exercise and Aging: Finding the right program for you

Staying fit and active as you age can be a major challenge for some individuals. Whether it is due to an injury or medical condition or simply the normal changes that occur with aging, at some point our bodies just don’t quite function how they used to. Generally speaking, older adults often experience a slowing of movement, which can in turn lead to decreased activity followed by decline in function and ultimately, a loss of independence.

On Thursday, June 8, 2017, the University of Pennsylvania’s Division of Human Resources – Quality of Work Life and AREUFIT Health Services, Inc. hosted a workshop on “Exercise and Aging” open to all Penn faculty and staff to discuss safe and effective ways that older adults can work to maintain their function.

“As we age, our muscles tend to work on the “use it or lose it” principle,” said Micah Josephson, MS, representative of AREUFIT and leader of the workshop. There are two main neuromuscular changes that are often associated with aging – dynapenia, the loss of strength and power and sarcopenia, the loss of muscle tissue. However, research shows that exercise and physical activity can help slow or reduce the risk of these changes.

The question is, what type of exercise is the right one for you? Because all of our bodies are different, it is extremely important to understand what exercises and activities will best suit your needs or restrictions and help you achieve your goal.

Josephson presented some “official recommendations” for the following types of exercise: aerobic exercise (often referred to as “cardio”), strength training, balance training, and power training. When it comes to aerobic exercises like spinning, running, swimming, and a variety of group fitness classes such as Zumba, it is best to stick to 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity per week.

Strength training, which focuses on major muscle groups such as the torso and legs, is Screen Shot 2017-06-12 at 11.47.06 AMrecommended 2+ days a week. The most important factor is to focus on the number of repetitions (reps) you can reach in a certain number of sets. For example, if you are strength training and doing bicep curls (pictured here), you should try to reach 8-12 repetitions doing about 3-4 sets of this movement. The amount of weight that you should use varies person to person, but it should be enough that you are maxing out around 8-12 reps while still maintaining form and control of the movement.

According to Josephson, balance training is suggested 2-3 days per week/60 minutes per week. The National Institute on Aging (NIH) Senior Health website offers some great tips and examples of safe ways to practice balance training.

Finally, for power training, Josephson says it is best to practice high-speed, low-resistance movements, recommending 2 sets of 12-15 reps twice per week. Using bicep curls as an example again, when power training instead of focusing on reaching a specific number of reps, you would focus on the velocity, or speed, of your movements. You want to perform the movement as quickly as you can while still maintaining control of the weight and yourself.

Regardless of your age or abilities, the first step in determining the best exercise program for you is to set your goal. When setting your goal, you have to think as specifically as possible. For example, the goal of “being able to keep up with the grandkids” does not look the same for every individual. For some, this may be getting up and down on the ground to play a game, while for others it may be running around the yard or going on hikes. These goals focus on very different muscle movements and your exercise program should be tailored accordingly.

If you are serious about exercising and maintaining a safe, active lifestyle as you age, Josephson has three overarching recommendations:

  1. Make the choice to exercise regularly
  2. Find a professional trainer who can help guide you
  3. If you cannot meet regularly with the trainer, meet periodically for check-ins and re-assessments

However, if you do not have access to a personal trainer, there are many other resources that can help you on this journey. The National Institute on Aging (NIA)’s Go4Life campaign is designed to help older adults fit exercise and physical activity into their daily lives. They focus on nutrition, exercise, and safety and offer a variety of tips and examples of exercises for maintaining endurance, strength, balance, and flexibility.

The NIA’s main website is also a great source of information, not only for tips on exercising, but also for facts on the many benefits and ways that it can improve your quality of life.

“Through the Eyes of the Caregiver: Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) and the Penn FTD Center” premieres at the Penn FTD Center Caregiver Conference 2017

On Friday, May 12, 2017, the Penn Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) Center hosted its 9th annual Penn FTD Caregivers Conference at the University of Pennsylvania. The day-long conference held at the Smilow Center for Translational Research welcomed 150 attendees and consisted of a series of lectures that covered information around the latest scientific advances in research on FTD and its related disorders, such as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease and Corticobasal degeneration (CBD), as well as practical caregiving issues such as strategies for symptom management, understanding the genetics of FTD and genetic testing options, respite and supportive resources for caregivers, and legal and long-term care planning.

One of the highlights of this year’s conference was the premiere of “Through the Eyes of the Caregiver: Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) and the Penn FTD Center,” a short film sharing the stories of three caregivers whose loved ones are patients at the Penn FTD Center.

“The brunt of this disease falls solely on those closest to the individual with the disease unfortunately and it is very difficult to navigate the healthcare system and obtain the types of resources that give structure to a patient’s day-to-day life and to help a caregiver keep a patient safe and cognitively stimulated,” said David Irwin, MD, assistant professor and Cognitive Neurologist in the Penn FTD Center. The goal of this video is to show caregivers and family members of those with FTD that they are not alone in this life-altering process and that there are many support groups and community and medical resources available to them – including many at the Penn FTD Center – to help them every step of the way.

Watch “Through the Eyes of the Caregiver: Frontotemporal Degeneration (FTD) and the Penn FTD Center”*:

Two Penn FTD Caregivers Conference sponsors, the Alzheimer’s Association Delaware Valley Chapter and the Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD), were also in attendance to answer questions and present information on the many advocacy and community resources that they offer for patients with FTD or related disorders and their families and caregivers.

Learn more about the Penn FTD Center at: https://ftd.med.upenn.edu

* Learn more about each individual caregiver by watching their full story! Click the “i” icon bubble in the top right hand corner of the video for a drop down menu with links to each caregivers story! If you are watching on a mobile phone, click the title of the video which will open a drop down menu containing the links to each caregiver’s story as well as a link to the Virtual Tour of Penn’s FTD PPG and Penn FTD Center to learn more about the FTD research and care taking place at Penn.

Eliezer Masliah, MD, Director of NIA’s Division of Neuroscience visits Penn

EliezerMasliah_Flyer5217On Tuesday, May 2, 2017, Eliezer Masliah, MD*, Director of the National Institute on Aging’s (NIA) Division of Neuroscience, paid a visit to the University of Pennsylvania’s Institute on Aging (IOA), Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research (CNDR), and Penn Neurodegeneration Genomics Center (PNGC).

The reason for Dr. Masliah’s visit was not just to learn about the neurodegenerative disease and aging-related research that is taking place in these centers here at Penn, but also to see how they all collaborate and work toward mutual goals. This gave him the opportunity to see firsthand how NIA and National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding is being used and made worthwhile to support the groundbreaking work of these centers.

Several topics were covered during the visit including the inception and mission of the new Penn Neurodegeneration Genomics Center (PNGC), directed by Gerard D. Schellenberg, PhD, and its five NIH-funded projects, the Alzheimer’s Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC), Alzheimer’s Disease Sequencing Project (ADSP), Consortium for Alzheimer’s Sequence Analysis (CASA), Center for Genetics and Genomics of Alzheimer’s Disease (CGAD), and the NIA Genetics of Alzheimer’s Disease Data Storage Site (NIAGADS). Dr. Schellenberg and other PNGC members, including co-director Li-San Wang, PhD, associate professor of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and principal investigator of NIAGADS, presented some of the current work and future plans for PNGC to achieve their overarching goal to “completely resolve the genetics of Alzheimer’s disease.”

After the morning session, Dr. Masliah joined John Q. Trojanowski, MD, PhD, Director of the IOA, and Virginia M.-Y. Lee, PhD, Director of CNDR, with several of their lab members as well as several Penn faculty working in neurodegeneration, for an open discussion on the multidisciplinary approach of the IOA and CNDR. A key feature of these centers is their ability to collaborate across many different disciplines within the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine. This includes faculty members from several different departments such as Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Neurology, Psychiatry, Geriatric Medicine, and Epidemiology to name a few.

Among the many topics discussed, one that was of particular interest to Dr. Masliah was the large number of young investigators and finding out what it was that attracted them to Penn. Many of the lab members were eager to participate and to share their outlook on why Penn was the right place to start their research career. Overall, they agreed that the collaborative, multidisciplinary nature of these centers is what appealed to them most. They also praised Penn for its training and the encouraging environment that it provides for applying for research grants and other funding opportunities. Additionally, Penn is well known for its state of the art databases and data sharing, providing top-notch integration and access to resources for its investigators. Dr. Masliah was especially impressed with CNDR’s Integrative Neurodegenerative Disease Database (INDD) which tracks nearly 17,000 patients and/or research subjects at Penn’s several neurodegenerative disease related centers.

The visit concluded with a lecture by Dr. Masliah, titled “Advancing the National Plan to Address AD through National and International Collaborations.” During his talk, Dr. Masliah discussed the recent $2 billion NIH budget increase which includes $400 million new Alzheimer’s disease funds, new NINDS funding opportunities in partnership with NIA on Lewy body dementia (LDB), and the 17 new Alzheimer’s disease FOA’s.

In terms of what to expect for the future, Dr. Masliah says to stay tuned for changes in pay-lines for FY17, more funding for fellowship and K awards, and more funded FOA’s and 27 new FOA’s.


* In his position as the Director of the NIA’s Division of Neuroscience, Dr. Masliah oversees the world’s largest research program on Alzheimer’s disease-related dementias and cognitive aging. He is an internationally renowned neuroscientist and neuropathologist and has approximately 800 original research articles and 70 book chapters. 

CNDR Celebrates 25 Years of Groundbreaking Research

This year, Penn’s Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research (CNDR) is celebrating 25 years of groundbreaking research.

Celebrating 25 Years

In honor of this milestone, Penn Medicine organized an intimate anniversary event generously hosted by longtime supporters and friends of CNDR, Bob Lane, who is also an Institute on Aging External Advisory Board (IOA EAB) member, and his wife, Randi Zemsky, at their home in the Rittenhouse Square section of Philadelphia.

The event celebrated the work of CNDR over the past 25 years and highlighted research breakthroughs still on the horizon. It was also an opportunity to bring together and thank many of the Center’s supporters. The event was attended by David B. Roth, MD, PhD, Chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, CNDR researchers, IOA EAB members, supporters of the Center and close friends of the hosts.

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The History

— from “A Conversation with Drs. Lee and Trojanowski,” an article by Lisa Bain featured in the CNDR 25th Anniversary special edition newsletter (page 3) — 

Some twenty-five years ago when John Q. Trojanowski, MD, PhD, first envisioned a Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research (CNDR), Virginia M.-Y. Lee, PhD, MBA, saw only the additional paperwork that would be required. Since they were both already well established in the field, she thought, “what do we need a center for?” But he convinced her that branding and identifying CNDR as a common locus for studies of Alzheimer’s (AD) and Parkinson’s (PD) disease as well as Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig’s disease was very important to pursue; and they both knew that the mission — to find cures for these neurodegenerative diseases — was not something that they alone could solve.

They would need a team, infrastructure, an environment that would be welcoming to a multidisciplinary group of collaborators (see Figure 1) and of course, funding. “And that is the dream for CNDR that has come true,” said Trojanowski.

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Get the full story of CNDR’s history, mission, research, and programs in the 25th Anniversary special edition newsletter here:

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CNDR’s Annual Marian S. Ware Research Retreat Through the Years

Each year, CNDR hosts its annual Marian S. Ware Research Retreat to highlight any current or groundbreaking discoveries at CNDR and in the field of neurodegenerative disease research at large. Since the first event in 2000, CNDR has covered a variety of themes from genetics to training the next generation of scientists. Stay tuned for information on CNDR’s 2017 Research Retreat, but for now, take a look back at some of the topics covered in the past:

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You can also view an interactive timeline, including lists of past Retreat speakers, here!
(view in 3D mode for best experience)

Learn more about CNDR at: www.med.upenn.edu/cndr

 

 

First Phase of REACT! Trial Comes to a Close

100_0699The University of Pennsylvania recently wrapped up the first round of its Rhythm Experience and Africana Culture Trial (REACT!), a three-year pilot grant in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh and supported by the Alzheimer’s Association.

Participants and their guests were invited to the ending ceremony, hosted by the Institute on Aging, which included dance performances, presentations, and art displays showcasing the work that was done throughout the study.

For this trial, participants (ages 60-80) were sorted into one of two activities – an African dance group or an educational/discussion group – to compare the bene ts. Final results are still pending, but are anticipated to reveal whether or not brain health, fitness levels or quality of life improved as a result of participating in the dance or educational activities three times per week for six months.

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To learn more about REACT! visit: www.med.upenn.edu/aging/react.html

Penn’s CNDR celebrates 25 years of groundbreaking research with the supporters and friends who make it all possible

screen-shot-2016-11-08-at-3-01-13-pmThis year, the Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research is celebrating its 25th anniversary in a big way. Penn Medicine organized an intimate anniversary event generously hosted by longtime supporters and friends of CNDR, Bob Lane, an Institute on Aging External Advisory Board (IOA EAB) member, and his wife Randi Zemsky, at their home in the Rittenhouse Square section of Philadelphia. 

 

The event celebrated the groundbreaking work of CNDR over the past 25 years and highlighted research breakthroughs still on the horizon. It was also an opportunity to bring together and thank many of the center’s supporters. The event was attended by David B. Roth, MD, PhD, Chair of the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, CNDR researchers, IOA EAB members, supporters of the Center and close friends of the hosts.

Stay tuned for our special edition CNDR 25th Anniversary Newsletter coming early next year.

The National Institute on Aging’s Luigi Ferrucci, MD, PhD receives the IOA’s 2016 Joseph A. Pignolo Award in Aging Research

On Thursday, October 27, 2016, the Institute on Aging hosted its 2016 Joseph A. Pignolo Award in Aging Research event. The recipient of this year’s award — which is given annually to recognize significant contributions in the field of aging research — was Luigi Ferrucci, MD, PhD, an epidemiologist and geriatrician who is currently the Scientific Director of the National Institute on Aging (NIA) and Chief of the Longitudinal Studies Section.

During his lecture on “The Mechanisms of Age-related Loss of Muscle Biomechanical Quality,” Dr. Ferrucci discussed his work on trying to uncover the reasons why we lose muscle mass and strength in aging. “The important thing to understand is not why the muscles shrink, but why we lose muscle quality,” he said.

Watch the video below for a summary of Dr. Ferrucci’s lecture:

Dr. Ferrucci also shared a glimpse into other research happening at the NIA, including a relatively new study in which they selected a small population of healthy individuals in hopes of understanding their secret to maintaining their health in old age. They are conducting in-depth analyses of genomes, epigenetics, blood, and other tissue samples including muscle and skin biopsies. Through their research, they hope to develop technologies that do not require such labor-intensive interventions to be measured and can apply them to new generations of epidemiological studies of aging.

Dr. Ferrucci received the 2016 Pignolo Award in Aging Research for his 2015 publication, “Gene expression markers of age-related inflammation in two human cohorts,” in Experimental Gerontology. His research focuses primarily on the causal pathways leading to progressive physical and cognitive decline in older persons, and in particular, inflammation.

This publication was an attempt for Dr. Ferrucci and his colleagues to look at the genetics of aging in a “somewhat nontraditional way,” he said.

To read the full publication, click here.

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